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INTERVIEW

“My interviewer didn’t show!” What It Means & How To Respond

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“My interviewer didn’t show!” What It Means & How To Respond

Dear Liz,

I was supposed to have a phone interview today, but my interviewer never called… She did email me about 45 minutes later saying that her meeting had run over and was very apologetic, but it still stung.

This is the third time this month that an interviewer rescheduled on me last minute. It’s hard not to take it personally, and re-preparing for interviews has become a serious drain on my time, energy, and confidence.

Does this happen to everyone or is it just me? And what’s the best way to respond? Should I write off the organization, or do I just need to suck it up and accept this as part of my job search? I’m feeling seriously frustrated and am interested in your take on all this.

Sincerely,

Waiting By The Phone

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(VIDEO) "What's Your Greatest Weakness?" 5 Steps To Your Best Answer

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(VIDEO) "What's Your Greatest Weakness?" 5 Steps To Your Best Answer

Have you ever wondered what a GREAT response to the dreaded "What's your greatness weakness?" question sounds like?

Most people treat this question like an encounter with a hornet's nest: they freak out and then do whatever they can to get to the other side as unscathed as possible. 

But not preparing your answer in advance -- or giving a response like, "I'm a perfectionist," or, "I can't really think of any weaknesses right now..." can cost you the job offer.

So today I'm releasing a brief video that takes all the guesswork out of this question..

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Overcoming Interview Anxiety To Win The Job

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Overcoming Interview Anxiety To Win The Job

Dear Liz,

I have an interview coming up, and my friend who works at the company keeps offering to help me practice. I know it’s really nice of him to offer, but my gut is telling me not to do it. Practicing makes me uncomfortable, and I feel like I’ll be more relaxed and authentic if I go in fresh.

Should I trust my gut, or take my friend up on his offer? 

Sincerely,

Wanting-to-Wing-it

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Dear Wanting-to-Wing-it,

I want to commend you for asking this question. Every day I speak with clients who tell me they prefer not to prepare for interviews. 

Just like you, practicing makes them uncomfortable. They get this gut feeling that tells them…

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The 20 Most Common Interview Questions

The 20 Most Common Interview Questions

Nailing the interview starts to feel a whole lot less scary once you're exceptionally prepared. And that means being prepared to tackle each of these most-common interview questions with the NSC interview response formula

  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. Why are you interested in working for us?
  3. Why are you looking for a new job / why do you want to leave your current organization?
  4. What are your strengths?

4 Must-Ask Questions To Ask At The End Of Your Interview

4 Must-Ask Questions To Ask At The End Of Your Interview

At some point in the interview, likely towards the end, we know we’ll be asked for our questions (it happens in 84% of interviews). And we know asking good questions is important, since 32% of hiring managers in a recent study stated not asking good questions in the interview is one of the most detrimental mistakes job candidates make. 

Yet we often short-shift preparing for this inevitable moment of the interview. I hear it all the time: 

“I’ll just ask about company culture, or what they like most about working at the company, or about an exciting project coming up.” 

These mediocre questions may not hurt your chances of getting the job like some questions do (which I’ll be digging into next week), but they don’t help you either.

What few people realize is that great questions have the power to convince your interviewer to give you the offer -- sometimes right there in the interview room! And a handful of these great questions carry the dual benefit of eliciting information to help you determine whether you really want the job. 

The “Do you have any questions for me?” moment of the interview can confuse us, because we’ve prepared for and gotten used to responding; when the table turns, we can mistakenly put ourselves in the driver’s seat and assume what we ask doesn’t matter. 

And while in some cases this may be true (like when you know you’re the top pick for the job), most often you are still selling yourself during this part of the interview! Focus on questions that demonstrate your commitment and determination to helping your prospective employer be as successful as possible, and save the “me, me, me” questions for once you receive the offer.

Keep reading for our shortlist of dynamite win-win questions that get you one step closer to an offer -- and figuring out if you really want the job. 

10 Questions for Getting To “Yes” After A Rejection

10 Questions for Getting To “Yes” After A Rejection

So you interviewed for a job, started to see yourself in the position and feel it within your grasp, and then didn’t get the offer. This article will share step-by-step instructions on how to get the best insight out of your rejection and increase the likelihood of getting to “yes” next time. 

The One Trick You Need to Rock Your Next Interview

The One Trick You Need to Rock Your Next Interview

There must be thousands of articles on typical interview questions and how to prepare for them. Mostly, the advice tends to center around “be specific!” or “do your research!” or “make eye contact!” All good stuff. But I haven’t seen anything yet that shares the secret to interviewing, and the number one trick you can use to knock it out of the park, every time. 

So here’s the secret:

Want A Great Manager? Ask The Right Questions.

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Want A Great Manager? Ask The Right Questions.

A strong, positive relationship with your manager is one of the most critical components of loving your job.

You are not expected (or likely) to thrive working under any manager under the sun; all managers have different approaches to leadership, communication, defining and evaluating success, work-life balance and mentorship--as do you. Just like finding the right partner in love, fit is important. 

What you are expected to do, however, is work hard during your interview process to learn as much as you can about your prospective manager in order to make the most educated guess as possible about whether you will fit and thrive working together.  

Of course, you’re also half responsible for making your relationship with your manager great after you’ve accepted the job (fit doesn’t mean everything comes easy!). But that lesson is for another day. First, let’s focus on concrete steps to helping you evaluate your prospective manager before you get so excited about your offer that you forget to do your due diligence:

  • What to research about your prospective manager before meeting her/him
  • How to develop your question list for your in-person meeting
  • Reflection questions for after your meeting

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